Why is blue cheese blue?

Blue cheese is a general classification of cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, or goat’s milk cheeses that has had Penicillium cultures added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue, blue-gray or blue-green mold, and carries a distinct smell.
Blue and blue-green cheeses can be made from most cheese bases, whether the milk is from a cow, sheep, or goat. The main thing that makes a blue cheese blue is mold.
Roquefort cheese is a particular blue cheese that is made in the south of France. Some other blue cheeses are Stilton (England), Gorgonzola (Italy), Danablu (Denmark), and Americas’ entry, Maytag Blue Cheese. These are just a few, there are many more blue cheeses.
In the European Union many blue cheeses such as Roquefort, Gorgonzola, and Stilton are, like wine, a protected designation of origin, meaning they can bear the name only if they have been made in a particular region in a certain country. Similarly, individual countries have protections of their own such as France’s Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée and Italy’s Denominazione di Origine Protetta.

anulyok

anulyok

Did you know that I'm the original author of many of the blog posts you'll see here on www.didyouknow.it?

I have started this blog many years ago, and have since handed it off to someone else to continue bringing you some great did-you-knows and fun facts.
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